Atacama Desert Holds Secrets Of ‘Life On Mars

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Few spots are as threatening to life as Chile the Atacama Desert. It’s the driest non-polar desert on Earth, and just the hardiest microorganisms get by there. It’s rough scene has lain undisturbed for ages, presented to outrageous temperatures and radiation from the sun. It is said that if life is being found here in the Atacama Desert, then it might be possible for finding life on the surface of Mars, which is even harsher.

Stretching 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) from Peru’s southern border into northern Chile, the Atacama Desert rises from a thin coastal shelf to the pampas—virtually lifeless plains that dip down to river gorges layered with mineral sediments from the Andes. The pampas bevel up to the altiplano, the foothills of the Andes, where alluvial salt pans give way to lofty white-capped volcanoes that march along the continental divide, reaching 20,000 feet (6,000 meters). 

                                                                            The Giant hand buried in the Atacama desert 

At its center, a place climatologists call absolute desert, the Atacama is known as the driest place on Earth. There are sterile, intimidating stretches where rain has never been recorded, at least as long as humans have measured it. You won’t  see a blade of grass or cactus stump, not a lizard, not a gnat. But you will see the remains of most everything left behind. The desert may be a heartless killer, but it’s a sympathetic conservator. Without moisture, nothing rots. Everything turns into artifacts. Even little children.

It is a shock then to learn that more than a million people live in the Atacama today. They crowd into coastal cities, mining compounds, fishing villages, and oasis

towns. International teams of astronomers—perched in observatories on the Atacama’s coastal range—probe the

cosmos through perfectly clear skies. Determined farmers in the far north grow olives, tomatoes, and cucumbers with drip-irrigation systems, culling scarce water from aquifers. In the altiplano, the descendants of the region’s pre-Columbian natives (mostly Aymara and Atacama Indians) herd llamas and alpacas and grow crops with water from snowmelt streams. 
National Geographic

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