Special places to visit Sri Lanka.

Life style Travel

Sri Lanka is a small island in the Indian Ocean.

In one era of history, this country was called Ceylon.
Tea, coconut, rubber related crops are the main source of income in this country. Today’s tourism industry is a special place
Mainly Sinhalese live there.
In addition, a minority Tamil community also lives.
Muslims are living in the present because of the Arabs attending Sinhalese and Tamils in the Muslim religion.
It is a written history dating back to 2500 years built on the basis of the rich Buddhist nature of the eastern cultural heritage of the Indian Empire
In the recent 500 years, the Portuguese, Dutch and English invaders have western cultures and Catholicism.
Information and evidence of other human beings who lived before 28000 years ago have been found.
A tourist paradise,  Sri  Lankan, in a beautiful hollow area and beautiful seaside.
People who live here are well-educated and sociable.
The majority of people are able to handle the English language well.

The following are the 10 places you should visit by a traveler
     Benthota
Is a spectacular, beautiful coastal strip. Any traveler has the freedom to make the most of his freedom.

  Nuwara Eliya
  Nuwara Eliya, which is surrounded by hills and slopes, has a chilling climate. It is between 1900 and 6100 feet. It is an area with tea cultivation. The forest and evergreen forests are abundant.
   Anuradapuraya
Anuradhapura is an ancient sacred city that was established around a cutting from Buddha’s fig tree. Dating back to the third century BC, Anuradhapura was established by the founder of an order of Buddhist nuns. This magnificent city of palaces, temples and monuments flourished for 1,300 years but was abandoned after it was invaded in the late 10th century. Much like Peru’s Machu Picchu, locals were aware of it but not many others until it was “discovered” by Europeans many centuries later. These fantastic ruins have since been excavated and are accessible for the public to enjoy.
  Colombo
  Sri Lanka’s main commercial city.
  Yala National park
Animals rule the roost, the ground and the sky at Yala National Park, a wildlife sanctuary about 240 km (150 miles) from Colombo. Yala offers a plethora of things to do. Your visit begins with a safari to see animals, including elephants, water buffalo and leopards, found here in higher density than any other place in the world. Note: the park closes for September’s leopard breeding season. The park also is home to 215 bird species, of which seven are native to the park. Top sights, besides wild animals, are Sithulpauwwa, an ancient rock temple that once housed 12,000 monks, and Magul Maha Viharaya, once the setting for a royal marriage.
   Polonnaruwa
The terms “beauty” and “beast” usually go together well, except at Polonnaruwa where beauty goes better with “ruins.” The second oldest kingdom in Sri Lanka, Polonnaruwa is known for the ruins of this ancient garden city. The 12th century ruins are some of the best preserved in the country. Polonnaruwa was a place where traders of exotic goods mingled with worshippers in the many temples. Start your tour of Polonnaruwa at the Archaeological Museum, then proceed to the massive (50 buildings) Royal Palace with its well-preserved audience hall. The stunningly decorated Sacred Quadrangle is another must-see here.
Sigiriya
The palace and fortress complex is recognized as one of the finest examples of ancient urban planning. Considering the uniqueness of Sigiriya UNESCO declared it a World Heritage site in 1982. Sigiriya is an unmatched combination of urban planning, water engineering, horticulture and arts.
According to inscriptions found in the caves which honeycomb the base of the rock fortress, Sigiriya served as a place of religious retreat as far back as the third century BC, when Buddhist monks established refuge in the locale. It wasn’t until the fifth century AD, however, that Sigiriya rose briefly to supremacy in Sri Lanka, following the power struggle which succeeded the reign of Dhatusena (455-473) of Anuradhapura. King Dhatusena had two sons, Mogallana, by one of the most desired and finest of his queens, and Kassapa, by a less significant consort. Upon hearing that Mogallana had been declared heir to the throne, Kassapa rebelled, driving Mogallana into exile in India and imprisoning his father, King Dhatusena. The legend of Dhatusena’s subsequent demise offers an enlightening illustration of the importance given to water in early Sinhalese civilization.
Threatened with death if he refused to reveal the whereabouts of the state treasure, Dhatusena agreed to show his errant son its location if he was permitted to bathe one final time in the great Kalawewa Tank, of which the construction he had overseen. Standing within the tank, Dhatusena poured its water through his hands and told Kassapa that this alone was his treasure. Kassapa, none too impressed, had his father walled up in a chamber and left him to die. Mogallana, meanwhile, vowed to return from India and reclaim his inheritance. Kassapa, making preparations for the expected invasion, constructed a new dwelling on top of the 200-metre-high Sigiriya rock – a combination of pleasure palace and indestructible fortress, which Kassapa intended would emulate the legendary abode of Kubera, the god of wealth, while a new city was established around its base. According to folklore, the entire fortress was built in just seven years, from 477 to 485 AD.
Dabulla

The Rock Temple of Dambulla, called Jumbukola Vihara  (Dambulla cove temple) in the (Mahavamsa)-the principal Pali Chronicle of Sri Lanka, is situated about forty seven miles north west of  Kandy, the last capital of the Sinhalese kings, on the main road to Anuradhupura.
   Kandy
Kandy, the second largest city in Sri Lanka, is the gateway to the Central Highlands and its tropical plantations that grow both tea and rubber. If you’re driving from Colombo, you’ll pass by rubber plantations on a road that is considered one of the country’s most scenic. The last capital of the ancient kingdoms, Kandy is home to the Temple of the Tooth Relic, one of the most sacred Buddhist temples in the world. A major, colorful festival involves taking the tooth relic around the city. Movie buffs may be interested to know Kandy was a chief location in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.
  Galle
Galle’s most famous attraction is its 17th century fort built by Dutch colonists. Sitting on a promontory overlooking the Indian ocean,
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